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What is premature ejaculation? 

Ejaculation (aka “cumming”) is when semen spurts out of the opening of the urethra in your penis, usually during sex or masturbation. Premature ejaculation is when you ejaculate (cum) before you want to — usually before your partner has an orgasm

Premature ejaculation is pretty common. There’s nothing to worry about if it happens every once in a while. But it might be worth talking with a nurse or doctor about it if it happens more than half of the times you try to have sex.  

What causes premature ejaculation?

Nobody knows for sure what causes premature ejaculation, but it’s most likely psychological or emotional. Premature ejaculation is more common if you have anxiety about your sexual performance or if you're not used to having sex, like if you've never had sex before. Having hyperthyroidism — when the thyroid gland in your neck makes too much of a hormone called thyroxine — can also increase your risk of premature ejaculation.

Premature ejaculation isn’t caused by diseases, infections, or problems with your nervous system.

Are there premature ejaculation treatments? 

You can help reduce premature ejaculation in a variety of ways. Your nurse or doctor can help you decide what may work best for you.

Ongoing: 

  • Do pelvic floor exercises: Pretend you're trying to stop yourself from peeing. Tighten the muscles below your prostate and rectum for a few seconds, and then relax. Do this 3 times a day for 10 reps at a time to strengthen these muscles.

  • Talk openly about premature ejaculation with your partner to get their support and reduce your anxiety. Also, talk to them about the “pause and squeeze” method.
  • Practice the “pause and squeeze” method: When you’re masturbating or having sex with a partner, stop stroking your penis or having sex when you feel close to cumming. Press behind the tip of your penis and wait. After the feeling goes away, start masturbating or having sex again. You may need to practice this often.
  • Work with a sex therapist.
  • Talk to your doctor or nurse about prescription medicine that can lengthen the time before you orgasm.

Right before sex:

  • Masturbate so you need more time before you can orgasm again.
  • Spend more time on foreplay with your partner. You can also practice the pause-squeeze method and edging during foreplay.

During sex:

  • Use methods that can delay orgasm — such as thrusting slowly; taking breaks; changing positions; and using positions that limit your movement, like having your partner on top.
  • Try "edging" — where you almost orgasm, but stop yourself and take a break. It’s like the pause-squeeze method, except it doesn’t require any squeezing.
  • Focus on relaxing so you can slow your heart rate.
  • Use condoms.

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