Go to Content Go to Navigation Go to Navigation Go to Site Search Homepage

Your nurse or doctor will usually start by asking questions about your body, health, daily habits, relationships, and/or sex. It’s really important to be honest. They’re not trying to judge you or get you in trouble they just need to know this stuff to give you the best care. Then they’ll measure your height, weight, and blood pressure, and might give you a brief physical exam. During your check-up, the doctor or nurse may:

  • Give you the HPV vaccine.

  • Look at your genital area to make sure everything is healthy.

  • If you have a vagina, they may do a pelvic exam.

  • Test you for STDs (if you’ve had any kind of sex). STD testing is usually easy and painless — you’ll probably just pee in a cup.

  • If you have testicles (AKA balls), they may feel them to check for signs of testicular cancer, which is most common in younger adults (20-34 years old).

None of these things should be painful. If you feel pain or discomfort during your exam, tell your doctor or nurse — it could be a sign of a problem.

Also let your doctor or nurse know if you notice changes in your penis, testicles, breasts, or vulva.

You can bring a parent or other adult that you trust to your appointment. They can be in the room with you during your visit if you want. But you also have the right to talk with your doctor or nurse alone — and most of the time, your doctor will keep the info you share private. Read more about privacy at the doctor.

What happens at the gynecologist?

A gyno appointment usually starts with the nurse or doctor asking questions about your body, health, daily habits, relationships, sex, and/or birth control. Be honest —  they need to know this stuff to give you the best care. They’ll probably measure your height, weight, and blood pressure, and might give you a brief physical exam. If you have an exam, they might:

  • check your genitals and reproductive organs, like your vulva, vagina, uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes — this is called a pelvic exam. Pelvic exams usually only take a few minutes.

  • have you pee in a cup.

  • check your breasts.

  • test you for STDs (if you’ve had any kind of sex). STD testing is usually easy and painless.

  • give you the HPV vaccine.

  • give you a Pap test. You don’t usually need a Pap test until you turn 21, but some doctors do them sooner.

It’s normal to be a little nervous the first time you go to the gynecologist. Tell your doctor if you feel anxious or awkward, and they’ll do their best to help you feel as comfortable as possible.

You can bring a parent or other adult that you trust to your appointment, and they can be in the room with you during your visit if you want. But you also have the right to talk with your doctor or nurse alone — and most of the time, the doctor will keep the info that you share private. Read more about privacy at the doctor.