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Testicular cancer can happen in one or both testicles, and can affect people of any age. If it’s caught early, testicular cancer is treatable and usually curable.

What’s testicular cancer?

The testicles are the parts of your body that produce the hormone testosterone and sperm cells. Testicular cancer is a type of cancer that attacks one or both testicles. If left untreated, testicular cancer can spread to other parts of your body.

How common is testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer isn’t very common — only about 1 in every 263 people with testicles will have it in their lifetime. Most people with testicular cancer are diagnosed in their 20s or 30s, so it usually affects younger people. It’s possible to get testicular cancer at a younger or older age, but it’s not as common.

Am I at risk for testicular cancer?

There are some things that can potentially increase your risk of developing testicular cancer, but most people who have testicular cancer don’t have any risk factors. We don’t know exactly what causes testicular cancer, but you’re more at risk of having it if you:

  • Have a family history of testicular cancer

  • Have an undescended testicle

  • Have had testicular cancer before

  • Are between 20 and 34 years old

  • Have HIV/AIDS

How do I protect myself from testicular cancer?

We don’t know what causes testicular cancer. Most people who have testicular cancer don’t have any risk factors, so there isn’t much that can be done to prevent it.

If you notice any bumps or lumps in or around your testicles, have a nurse or doctor take a look. You can get a testicular exam at your local Planned Parenthood health center.

More questions from patients:

What causes testicular cancer?

We don’t know exactly what causes testicular cancer. Most people who have testicular cancer don’t have any risk factors, so there isn’t much that can be done to prevent it.

However, there are some things that may increase your risk of developing testicular cancer. You may be more likely to get testicular cancer if you:

  • Have a family history of testicular cancer

  • Have an undescended testicle

  • Have had testicular cancer before

  • Are between 15-39 years old

  • Have HIV/AIDS

If you have risk factors or are otherwise worried about getting testicular cancer, talk to your doctor or nurse about your concerns.

If you notice any symptoms, have a nurse or doctor take a look. You also can get a testicular exam at your local Planned Parenthood health center.

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