Sexual anatomy that’s typically called female includes the vulva and internal reproductive organs like the uterus and ovaries

What are the parts of the female external sexual anatomy?

The vulva is the whole female genital package — your labia, clitoris, vaginal opening, and the opening to the urethra (the hole you pee out of). While vaginas are just one part of the vulva, many people say “vagina” when they really mean the vulva. But the vulva has a lot more going on than just the vagina.

No 2 vulvas look exactly the same, but they’re made up of the same basic parts.

  • Labia
    The labia (lips) are folds of skin around your vaginal opening. The labia majora (outer lips) are usually fleshy and covered with pubic hair. The labia minora (inner lips) are inside your outer lips. They begin at your clitoris and end under the opening to your vagina.

    Labia can be short or long, wrinkled or smooth. Often one lip is longer than the other. They also vary in color from pink to brownish black. The color of your labia can change as you get older. Some people have larger outer lips than inner lips, and many have larger inner lips than outer lips. Both are sensitive, and swell when you're turned on.

  • Clitoris
    The tip of the clitoris (clitoris glans) is located at the top of your vulva, where your inner lips meet. It varies in size from smaller than a pea to bigger than a lima bean. And it’s covered by the clitoral hood.

    The tip is just the beginning of the clitoris though. The rest of your clitoris is inside your body. It extends back and down on both sides of the vagina. This part, called the shaft and crura (roots and legs), is about 5 inches long.

    Your clitoris is made of spongy tissue that becomes swollen when you're aroused (turned on). It has thousands of nerve endings — more than any other part of the human body. And it’s only purpose? To make you feel good.

  • Opening of the urethra
    The urethral opening is the tiny hole that you pee out of, located just below your clitoris.

  • Opening of the vagina
    The vaginal opening is right below your urethral opening. It's where menstrual blood leaves your body, and babies are born through the vaginal opening. A variety of things can go inside your vagina, like fingers, penises, sex toys, tampons, and menstrual cups.

  • Mons pubis
    The mons is the fleshy mound above your vulva. After puberty, it’s covered with pubic hair. It cushions your pubic bone.

What are the parts of the female internal sexual anatomy?

The internal parts of female sexual anatomy (or what’s typically referred to as female) include:

  • Vagina
    The vagina is a tube that connects your vulva with your cervix and uterus. It’s what babies and menstrual blood leave the body through. It’s also where some people put penises, fingers, sex toys, menstrual cups, and/or tampons. Your vagina is really stretchy, and expands when you feel turned on.

  • Cervix
    The cervix divides your vagina and uterus, located right between the two. It looks like a donut with a tiny hole in the middle. This hole connects your uterus and your vagina. It lets menstrual blood out and sperm in. Your cervix stretches open (dilates) during childbirth.

    You can usually feel your cervix at the end of your vagina if you insert your fingers, a penis, or a sex toy into your vagina. Your cervix separates your vagina from the rest of your body, so things like tampons or other objects can’t get “lost” inside of you.

  • Uterus
    The uterus is a pear-shaped muscular organ about the size of a small fist. It’s sometimes called the womb because it’s where a fetus grows during pregnancy. During sexual arousal, the lower part of your uterus lifts toward your belly button. That’s why your vagina gets longer when you’re turned on. It’s called “tenting.”

  • Fallopian tubes
    The fallopian tubes are 2 narrow tubes. They carry eggs from your ovaries to your uterus. Sperm travels through them to try to fertilize your egg.

  • Fimbriae
    The fimbriae look like tiny fingers at the end of each fallopian tube. When your ovary releases an egg, they sweep it into your fallopian tube.

  • Ovaries
    The ovaries store your eggs. They also produce hormones, including estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. These hormones control things like your period and pregnancy. During puberty, your ovaries start to release an egg each month. They do so until menopause. Sometimes your ovaries release more than one egg.

  • Bartholin’s glands
    The Bartholin’s glands are near your vaginal opening. They release fluid that lubricates your vagina (makes it wet) when you’re turned on.

  • Skene’s glands
    The Skene’s glands are on either side of your urethral opening. They release fluid during female ejaculation.They’re also called paraurethral glands or female prostate glands.

  • Hymen
    The hymen is the thin, fleshy tissue that stretches across part of the opening to the vagina. Hymens vary a lot in how much of your vaginal opening they cover, and they can sometimes (but not always) tear and cause bleeding the first few times you put something in your vagina.

  • G spot
    The G spot, or Gräfenberg spot, is located on the front or belly-button side of your vagina. It’s a few inches inside your vagina. Your G-spot swells when you’re turned on. Some people like the feeling of having their G-spot touched.