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I just ended my period. My boyfriend came and then an hour and a half later he we did it wihtout a condom… Could i be pregnant?

It’s possible — there’s no “safe” time in your menstrual cycle to have sex without using birth control. Here’s why: 

Pregnancy can happen when the sperm cells in semen (cum) meet up with one of your eggs. Your ovaries release an egg every month — that’s called ovulation

After sex, sperm can live for up to 5 days in your body waiting for one of these eggs. That means that even if you weren’t ovulating when you had sex, sperm can still meet up with your egg later on. 

Ovulation usually happens about 14 days before your period starts — but everyone’s body is different. You may ovulate earlier or later, depending on the length of your menstrual cycle.

If all this sounds super complicated, that’s because it is. And everyone’s menstrual cycle is a little different, which makes it even MORE complicated. It’s also very common for peoples’ cycles to be irregular, which means your period comes at different times  —  especially when you’re younger. But even if your cycle is regular, it can be hard to know exactly when you’re ovulating and at risk for pregnancy. That’s why it’s so important to use birth control (like condoms, the pill, or an IUD) every time you have sex if you don’t want to get pregnant. 

If you do have unprotected sex, there’s still something you can do to prevent pregnancy afterwards. The morning-after pill (also known as emergency contraception) is a type of birth control that you can take up to 5 days after unprotected sex — but the sooner you take it, the better it works. You can get the morning-after pill at drugstores, pharmacies, and superstores without a prescription from a doctor, no matter your age or gender. Learn more about emergency contraception.

 

Tags: pregnancy, periods, unprotected sex

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