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The Paragard, Mirena, and Liletta IUDs are the most effective types of emergency contraception. They work up to 5 days after unprotected sex, and keep preventing pregnancy for up to 7 to 12 years (depending on which one you get).

How effective are IUDs as emergency contraception?

An IUD lowers your chances of getting pregnant by more than 99.9 percent if you get it put in within 5 days of unprotected sex. It’s the most effective kind of emergency contraception there is. And unlike morning-after pills, it works the same no matter how much you weigh. To see which EC makes the most sense for you, take our quiz.

One of the most convenient things about getting an IUD as emergency contraception is that it keeps giving you super-effective birth control for up to 7 to 12 years (depending on which kind you get). So once you get an IUD, you won’t have to think about emergency contraception again until you get it taken out.

How do I use the IUD as emergency contraception?

In order for the Paragard, Mirena, or Liletta IUD to work as emergency contraception, a doctor or nurse must put it in within 5 days after you have unprotected sex. Call your doctor, local family planning clinic, or your nearest Planned Parenthood health center as soon as you realize you need emergency contraception. It can be hard to get an appointment for an IUD insertion on short notice, so call as quickly as possible.

At your appointment, a doctor or nurse will put the IUD into your uterus, and that’s it — you don’t have to do anything else. Once your IUD is in place, you get great emergency contraception AND long-lasting birth control all at once. Learn more about the IUD.

If you can’t get an appointment to have an IUD put in within 5 days after you have unprotected sex, take a morning-after pill like ella or Plan B as soon as possible. Morning-after pills aren’t as effective at preventing pregnancy as the IUD is, but they’re definitely better than doing nothing at all.

What are the IUD side effects?

Serious problems with IUDs are rare, and millions of people have used them safely.

Some people have annoying but harmless side effects after getting an IUD. They usually go away in about 3 – 6 months, once your body gets used to having the IUD in your uterus.

All IUDs can cause mild to moderate pain when the IUD is put in, and cramping for the few days after.

The copper IUD can cause side effects like heavier periods and worse menstrual cramps. Hormonal IUDs are more likely to do the opposite — including lighter periods, irregular periods, or not having periods at all while using the IUD. 

Where can I get an IUD?

Contact your gynecologist, a family planning clinic, or your local Planned Parenthood health center to make an appointment to get an IUD.

Getting an IUD costs anywhere between $0 to $1,300. That’s a pretty wide range, but the good news is that IUDs are free or low cost with many health insurance plans, Medicaid, and some other government programs. And even if an IUD costs a lot up front, they usually end up saving you money in the long run because they give you really effective birth control for up to 7 to12 years.

Planned Parenthood works to provide you with the services you need, whether or not you have insurance. Many Planned Parenthood health centers charge less for services depending on your income. If you’re worried about cost, check with your local Planned Parenthood health center to see if they can hook you up with emergency contraception and other birth control that fits your budget.

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