Planned Parenthood

West and Northern Michigan

For Teens

Where Do We Stand?

PPWNM believes that teens deserve answers to their questions, have the right to receive respectful and confidential medical and educational services, and will act sexually responsibly if given the facts, skills, and support.

Peer Education

This unique 40-hour training program covers a wide range of teen issues including sexuality, relationships, communication, and healthy decision making. It's honest, open, and comprehensive. Click here to find out how to get involved.

Safer Choices Project

The Safer Choices Project, a teen pregnancy prevention initiative,provides young people with the information, skills, and support they need to develop healthy relationships; prevent early, unprotected intercourse and unintended pregnancy, as well as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV; and increase communication with their parents. For young people ages 12-18. Currently available in Kent and Muskegon counties only. Click here to learn more.

Where Can I Go For Birth Control and Infection Testing?

Planned Parenthood provides confidential medical care for teens at all of its health centers. Click here for a complete listing of PPWNM Health Centers or call (800) 230-PLAN (7526).

Text Questions, Get Answers

Planned Parenthood offers a text hotline for teens with questions about pregnancy, birth control, emergency contraception, abortion, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Text "PPGO" to 774636 (PPINFO) to get answers to your questions. Check out this YouTube video to learn more, including hours of operation (listed in video description).

Tips for Talking to Your Parents About Anything Including Sex

1. Tell your parents about your day-to-day experiences. Keeping the lines of communication open with daily conversation will make it easier to discuss more personal topics later.

2. Initiate conversations by telling your parents about a book you are reading, a movie you've seen, something you heard on TV or read in the news. This can be an excellent way to bring up difficult topics.

3. Bringing up personal issues may be easier when the situation is discussed as a concern or experience of "a friend."

4. Whenever you can, share your feelings, ideas, goals, aspirations and concerns with your parents. Let them get to know you and to feel a part of your life.

5. Ask your parents about their feelings, ideas, goals and concerns. A sincere effort to learn about them as people, not just as parents, will probably be welcomed. However, if they choose not to share, respect their privacy.

6. Listen as well as talk. When discussing something important to us, it is easy to get caught up in our own thoughts and forget to listen to the other person.

Once you have begun a positive pattern of communication, it will be easier to talk to your parents about sexuality. You may want to ask them some of the questions listed below as a way to start the discussion.

1. How did you learn about sex and sexuality? Did your parents talk to you? If so, how old were you? Could you ask them questions?

2. Did you have sexuality education in school or church?

3. What misinformation did you get from friends or the media?

4. Were you told any scary stories about sex?

Links for Teens About Sexuality

Info for Teens (from Planned Parenthood Federation of America)

Advocates for Youth

I Wanna Know

Seriously Sexuality

Sex Etc.

Stay Teen

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

Doing a report? Check out our Links to Learning.

Become an advocate for responsible sexuality educationand information we have advocacy groups for teens and college students!

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For Teens