Recent Study Results

Summary of Statewide Polling in Iowa

For the fifth consecutive year, voters in Iowa express strong favoritism towards Planned Parenthood. The organization’s strength with voters transcends gender, age, and geographic lines.

By a 2:1 margin, voters view Planned Parenthood favorably, unchanged from previous years

  •  Iowa voters give Planned Parenthood a 62% favorable – 29% unfavorable rating, virtually identical to their rating last year (63% favorable – 32% unfavorable). The chart below shows Planned Parenthood’s favorability over the past five years.
  • Among the voters who rate Planned Parenthood favorably, half are very favorable towards the organization (32%).

Support for Planned Parenthood cuts across age, gender, and regional lines

  • While women are more favorable towards Planned Parenthood (64% favorable – 28% unfavorable), male voters are also 2:1 favorable towards 
  • Likewise, younger voters are more favorable towards Planned Parenthood (77% fav – 18% unfav among voters under 35), but all age breaks are roughly 2:1 favorable towards the organization.
  •  In every media market, Planned Parenthood’s favorability rating is above 60% -- in Cedar Rapids it is 62% - 26%, in Davenport it is 60% - 31%, in Des Moines it is 64% - 28%, and in Omaha it is 60% - 36%.

Voters in Iowa express dissatisfaction with the priorities the Iowa state legislature has focused on this past session, with a majority wanting the legislature to focus on the economy and jobs above all else.

Nearly half (46%) of Iowa voters feel the legislature had the wrong priorities during the most recent session; only one in three (33%) think they had the right ones.

  • Voters do not believe that the Iowa state legislature focused on the right priorities this past session. Not only do 46% believe they focused on the wrong priorities, but 49% of Independents, and 54% of Democrats also believe they had the wrong priorities.

Voters overwhelmingly wanted the legislature to focus on jobs and the economy, ahead of all other issues

  • The top priority voters wanted the legislature to focus on was jobs and the economy (58% cited it as the issue they’d want the legislature to make their first or second priority). Behind that, important issues to voters were education (26%) and budget and taxes (25%). Issues like healthcare (12%), social issues (7%), and the environment (4%) did not rank as important priorities.

Only 2% of voters said that social issues should be the legislature’s #1 priority, compared with 48% who said that jobs and the economy should be their top priority.

Instead, voters believe that the legislature made the budget and social issues their top priorities

  • Just 22% of voters believe that the legislature actually did place jobs and the economy as their top priority, putting it behind the budget and taxes (40%) and social issues (28%) in voters’ perceptions of the legislature’s top priority. Education (16%), healthcare (6%), and the environment (4%) fell behind these.

Iowa voters overwhelmingly support teaching a comprehensive sex education curriculum in Iowa public schools that would include information about contraceptives as a way to prevent pregnancy and STIs. Beyond this, voters express similarly high levels of support for providing state funding for family planning services, including providing contraceptives to low-income women.

By a 51-point margin, voters support teaching comprehensive sex education in Iowa public schools.

  • Voters support teaching comprehensive sex education in Iowa public schools as opposed to teaching abstinence only (70% comprehensive - 19% abstinence only). Over the last three years, voters’ support for teaching comprehensive sex education in public schools has progressively expanded, depicted in the figure below.
  •  Even among the 19% of voters who prefer an abstinence only curriculum, 46% support including information about STIs and their prevention in public schools’ curriculum.
  •  Among parents who have children in Iowa public schools, support for comprehensive sex education is even higher – 75% support comprehensive sex education.


Voters strongly support providing funding for family planning services to women who cannot afford it

  • By a nearly 2:1 margin (60% - 34%) voters believe that the state of Iowa should fund family planning services including contraceptives to people who cannot afford it.

Anzalone Liszt Research conducted N=800 live telephone interviews with likely 2012 voters in Iowa, including
10% cell phone completes. Interviews were conducted between September 6 – 14, 2011. Respondents were selected
at random, with interviews apportioned geographically based on past voter turnout. Expected margin of sampling
error is #3.5% with a 95% confidence level.

 

 

Anzalone Liszt Research conducted N=800 live telephone interviews with likely 2010 general election voters in Iowa. Interviews were conducted between August 9-16, 2010. Respondents were selected at random, with interviews apportioned geographically based on past voter turnout. Expected margin of sampling error is #3.5% with a 95% confidence level.

 


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